Technique Bonus

Technique Bonus articles belong to a main article in the Technique section.

Self-made Templates

The major difference between a template and a stencil is that you use the outer edges of template to transfer your pattern to fabric. Usually, a template is easier to make yourself than a stencil...

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Commercial Stencils

Commercial Stencils

Commercial quilting stencils come in many patterns, motifs and sizes. They are mostly made from thin plastic sheets (light pink, light turquoise or white) from which the lines of the motifs have been cut out as a “interrupted” path, i. e. a dashed line. This allows you to mark the outline of the pattern without the stencil falling apart...

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Fabric Sculptures

Fabric Sculptures

Fabric sculptures are easy to make and great fun. You can use up all kinds of scraps: strips, odd shaped pieces, unwanted pre-cuts... You could also add pieces of yarn and embroidery floss to make your sculptures even more interesting... (30 July 2011) - WITH EMBEDDED YOUTUBE FILM!

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Mounting a Quilt on a Frame

Framing a Quilt

Framing a quilt on a stretcher is surprisingly easy. It looks very neat and is suitable for any type of quilt. As long as you can find the appropriate sizes of stretcher, you are not limited in the format of your framed quilt. Anything goes: small, large, square, rectangle, landscape or portrait... (14 July 2011)

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Marbling

Marbling

A great way of manipulating the colour of fabric and a fun activity for young and old paint dabbers alike, is fabric marbling. In its most basic version, this technique requires comparatively few utensils and still produces fantastic results... (13 July 2011)

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Sunprinting

Sunprinting

There are so many ways of dying, painting on and printing on fabric that you could get dizzy enumerating them all. And as you leaf through quilt and other craft magazines, you might get the impression that something new is added everyday.

Sunprinting is certainly not a new technique, but we think it is one of the coolest ways of splashing colour on humble white cotton. Perhaps because you do it in the sun and because its results never cease to fascinate...

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Quick Piecing Half-Square Triangles: The Method the Quilt Police Doesn’t Like

Quick Piecing Half-Square Triangles

Half-square triangles are used very often in patchwork. For many block and quilt designs a huge number of triangles is required. Therefore, saving time on this particular shape is a significant advantage when you don’t have all the time in the world to spend on a project... (31 May 2011)

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Customized Address Labels with EQ7

Customized Address Labels with EQ7

EQ7 is a great tool to design quilt blocks and quilts, but did you know that you can also use it to create your very own personalized stationery? With the help of a word processing programme, you can easily create customized address labels that will not only turn the head of the postman... (31 May 2011)

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Crazy Quilting by Machine (Simple Method)

Technique

  • Iron the foundation material and cut a piece from it that is ca. 1” (2.5 cm) larger than your finished Crazy block. If this is your first attempt at Crazy Quilting, we suggest that you don’t cut the foundation piece too large.
  • Cut pieces from the fabrics you intend to use for your first Crazy block. There are only a very few rules for Crazy quilting: The first rule says that you should cut the shapes as irregular and “crazy” as possible... (4 May 2011)

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Template Free Block Units

Firmament Block

This chapter of the Template Free Piecing Book is meant to be a reference tool for every quilter who likes to design her or his own grid-based blocks, but is not keen on all the theoretical stuff about grid analysis. We have collected and will continue to collect block units which you can use to build up your own block designs. The units are organized in alphabetical order. You will find the list at the end of this introductory article. If the units are well-known in their own right, such as Flying Geese or Sawtooth, we have used these names. For the rest, we have tried to find fitting names... (17 April 2011)

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